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Despite being massive thanks to the NENBC officially retired, Phil still visits Nigeria several times each Committee for proposing me as the year, primarily to oversee the Ornithological Research next President, and to the Centre at Jos, as well as co-ordinating the activities of the membership for voting me in. Laventis Foundation. We have indeed been highly really do consider it a great honour honoured to have him as our President for the last five to be President of such a years.

My first official role was as a Second in the country. It took the envy of many others some of which have been going me 50 more years before I became a Captain, but not I for far longer. Much of this has been due to the very hard hasten to add in the army, but at Sheringham Golf Club, work of the committee and officers of the Club, none more and now I have reached the dizzy heights of a President! It is probably for that all I can to serve the Club to the best of my ability. As a Club we have so much to offer contribution that Phil has made, and is still making, to as far as the collection of important data is concerned, conservation in Nigeria, I would like briefly to give a which can then be used in future conservation plans.

It is of his work in West Africa.

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He arrived in Nigeria in most opportune that the NENBC is planning a One-daythe same year that I moved to Sheringham, where he Conference for July on the effects of climate change on took up an appointment as an ecologist for the North- birds. During this time, Phil was responsible for drawing up a conservation policy, an environmental education programme and the establishment of one of the most important wetland reserves in West Africa. Sadly, there was just the one photo taken during January and the lack of sightings is mirrored in the England Bird Track reporting rates for the period.

Earlier in the week I sent out an to you all about a potential venue change for our evening talks.

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To enable us to make the best decision for the whole club going forward, we would really appreciate your feedback to the specific questions asked regardless of whether you attended the trial event. Club Statistics individual members 14, bird records photo uplo to our bird species reported across households logged on our website in website in on our website in so far in Please keep adding all your sightings to our website at www. Let us know if you have forgotten your password and need it resetting or need assistance on how to your records. The rationale for the change is that it will enable us to better judge our print runs for our Annual Reports.

Many thanks. Contributions to the Newsletter If you have any an article. The newsletter is reliant on input from others, and texts you can donate to the club it would be much appreciated. Please have a think about whether there is anything committee members over the summer if you want to drop them you could write about for a future publication There is so much knowledge and activity out no longer want, we would be happy to advertise it for sale in this there that would be great to hear about.

Get your thinking caps newsletter or put on a stall at our evening talks in return for a on!! See advert below As usual, full and last minute details are available on our Club website. Please do check before coming on the walks as the climatic conditions may mean we need to make late alterations to route or start points.

Children are always welcome if accompanied by well-behaved adults, but we regret no dogs. Please wear clothing appropriate to the weather - footpaths in Felbrigg can be muddy at any time of the year. To keep the club's carbon footprint Tits in Weybourne pa, please consider car sharing.

As usual, children are welcome if accompanied by well- behaved adults, but we regret no dogs. Children are welcome if accompanied by well-behaved adults, but we regret no dogs. At the time of writing the car park is free. Our second site is Lynford Arboretum where we will park in the free car park on the left hand side, opposite the entrance to the Arboretum, OS Explorer TL These sites are about an hour's drive from north Norfolk.

At Mundford roundabout take the A towards Thetford and then take the second turning on the right to Santon Downham. After the rail level crossing and the humped-backed river bridge St Helen's Car Park tuning is tucked in on the left. The car park is on the left after about a mile. We can proceed in convoy to Lynford Arboretum. Note: The path along the Little Ouse River can be muddy and slippery so wear good walking boots. Telescopes will be useful. Distance: Approximately 4 miles, 3 at Santon Downham and 1 at Lynford Description: This two centre excursion will make the best of a winter's day in Breckland.

The St Helens Car park area and the habitat along the Little Ouse River is known as being one of the very few sites in the UK where Lesser Spotted Woodpeckers are regularly seen in the early months of the year. Other species that we will try for are Firecrest around St Helen's Church or along the river banks, Mandarin Duck on the river and Crossbills in the conifers.

In some years a Great Grey Shrike winters in the area, and if it is there we will look for it but this may mean a detour on our drive over to Lynford Arboretum. Otters are present on the River as well. The walk at St Helens could be up to 3 miles depending on where the Lesser Spotted Woodpeckers have been seen.

We will then go to the Arboretum keeping our eyes and ear on alert for Crossbills in the conifers. The trees are also good for Siskin, Gold and Firecrest. All three species of woodpecker can occur in the Arboretum along with Nuthatch, Treecreeper, Brambling, Chaffinch, tit flocks and our prime objective, Hawfinch. These special birds are frequently seen on top of the trees in the meadow at dusk or at a small drinking pool near the entrance to the Arboretum. There are often good opportunities for photographing passerines in the Arboretum as seed is left on gate post pillars.

Our time here will be a stroll of about a mile. This talk looks at the Cape May year — from winter Harlequin Ducks to the heady days of summer and back to winter, via magical spring and autumn migration. Prepare for an exciting trip! Please park along Church Road or in the overflow car park at the church coming into Aylmerton from the A, turn left immediately after the church and left into the car park but bring a torch for the m walk along the road to the hall. Please ensure that local residents can still access their driveways and there is sufficient clearance for agricultural vehicles to use the road.

A torch might also be helpful, as the village has no street lighting. NENBC will be there. Cromer Peregrine Project Call for Volunteers The Cromer Peregrine Project will be starting again at the beginning of April and we would like to hear from anyone who wishes to be involved with the Peregrine Watchpoint and who hasn't already been in touch with Ann Cleall.

We are looking for more people to us, as the more we have the more we can spread the load. Even if you can only do the occasional stint it would still be a great help. We are planning a volunteer training session on March 10th at the Community Centre, Garden Street, Cromer from 7pm to 9pm for those who are interested in assisting. This will set our volunteers up with more information on the ecology of the birds as well as iron out the logistics of running the project itself.

We learned a lot last year and have looked at how best to manage things this year. Please contact Ann on [ protected] for Tits in Weybourne pa info and to book a place on the training. Goodness, how many of these people were waiting for us?

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We weren't late It was great to see 29 club members, and to welcome both new members and others who had not been out on a weekend walk before. After an introduction we began by scanning the saltmarshes from the car park and eastwards along the coastal foot path. It was also lovely to see several Hares running around. Scanning the marshes with a telescope located a small flock of Golden Plover and in the distance a few Teal and Mallard.

The tide was out and we could see waves breaking in the tidal race around the end of Blakeney Point. A Little Grebe showed for some but it kept diving. From the coastal footpath we turned inland along a track to see what we could find on the fields to the south of the coast.

Amongst the Woodpigeons a Stock Dove was found. Brent Geese were flying over.

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We walked back to the car park through the small deciduous copse which overlooks the sea and the fields. Although quiet on Sunday, with just a Great Tit, this is a good migrant trap in autumn. We kept our eyes peeled over the fields and the bird of the trip was sighted, a Barn Owl patrolling the ditches and field.

We had lovely prolonged views. It was difficult to work out how many Barn Owls there were as one also flew along the coastal side of the copse. I personally had four excellent sightings and we thought there were at least two birds. Other bird species here and in the hedges around the car park were a Song Thrush, Blackbird, Long-tailed Tits, Greenfinch and Goldfinch.

After returning to the car park we moved into Raptor Roost mode taking up places a little way along the coastal footpath to the west of the car park.

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Following a recce the day before I decided that as the path was very wet and slippery we wouldn't go too far towards Tits in Weybourne pa. Most of the activity was westwards towards East Hills. Birds spotted were Marsh Harriers, Hen Harrier ring tailedBuzzard, Short-eared Owl and a distant raptor which sat on the ground with its back to us only giving very short flight views.

The jury is still out on whether it was a peregrine or a female Merlin. As with raptor watching not everyone saw every bird and those with scopes faired best. It was a very clear night and so the activity and daylight continued until well past 4. The cold eventually started to penetrate and we left at about 4. During the afternoon we saw 36 species and two heard only Red-legged and Grey Partridge.

My thanks to Andy for co-leading and to Francis Farrow for providing the photos. Photo Plea! Shots of birds, the site and especially the attendees appreciated! Once there I identified Roughly twenty members attended this first walk of the the right tree but it was Anne year.

Overnight a storm had blown through which had left Sims who found it. With a all paths wet and muddy. Nick had seen a Barn Owl couple of telescopes set up heading towards the wet meadow as he walked down from we ensured that everyone the hall so this was the first target.

We used the shelter saw it. At the south end most As is normal of late, gunfire people had a brief view of the Barn Owl as it headed back had moved all the gull flocks towards the hall. As we approached I found a Green Feeling that luck was on our side, we headed through the Woodpecker perched in the dead tree below the dam, it wood behind the hall hoping for Firecrest but as usual was happy to stay there so we had good views from the nothing was found. The Walled Garden added the usual dam before it finally took flight.

From here we headed The lake still held good s of Gadwall and Mallard, a towards the church where Carol had recently found Little few Tufted Duck plus a few Moorhen. The swans were split between the lake and the flood. The west bank added Nuthatch and a Great Spotted Woodpecker but nothing else despite putting out feed. The route round to the bridge over the beck was very muddy but a few of us did see a couple of probable Song Thrush disappear into a patch of Bramble.

The beck was in full flood but Teal and Grey Heron were added quite quickly. A couple of brief calls gave a Water Rail from the reedbed. A lone Wigeon proved much more difficult to find but was the final bird of the walk bringing us to 38 species for the walk. Add to this coast of Anglesey. A lifetime with birds and as Chairman of the sheer and variety of species seen at any one the British and Irish Bird Observatories and chair of the time and it soon awakens a realisation of how important Welsh Rarities Committee he comes well qualified and Bardsey is and its magnetic attraction of birders.

Then gave us a both entertaining and informative evening. He packs his bags and flora and the management of the varying habitats. A Kestrel flew from the church roof and put on a splendid display. At the fishing ponds later we found a sole fisherman, a Cormorant, and a Greylag Goose.

Tits in Weybourne pa

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